Daw Aung San Suu Kyi can be a Better Leader

24 January 2012: (Editorial) There is no doubt that Burma’s Nobel Peace Laureate and opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi commands great respect from all citizens of Burma, including the country’s long-marginalized ethnic groups. That source of respect comes from her not just being the daughter of Burma’s independence leader General Aung San, but more importantly, from her personal sacrifice for the principles she has unwaveringly stood for during the last two decades.
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'Give Me Three Promises and You Will Get What You Want'

01 December 2011: The Secretary of States of the United States, Hillary Clinton is scheduled to visit Myanmar/Burma on December 1st to meet with President U Thein Sein and high ranking military back quasi-civilian government. One of the most compelling issues on the table is renewing diplomatic ties between two countries and lifting sanctions imposed by the US government. Before making a historic decision by a compassionate U.S. government, the Secretary of States, Hilary Clinton must carefully scrutinize what President U Thein Sein has said in a Bali Press Conference.
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Without Diversity, There Can Be No Unity

24 November 2011: The recent political developments unfolding in the Union of Burma are positive signs showing that we could possibly see the restoration of democracy and national reconciliation we have long sought for. The NLD – the party of Aung San Suu Kyi – has decided to formally register its party to vie for power; there have been high-level meetings aimed at resolving conflict between Minister Aung Min and leaders of ethnic opposition armed groups; and finally, the U.S. has intensified its diplomatic efforts.
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Burma Must Repeal Repressive, Outdated and Unconstitutional Colonial Era Laws

23 November 2011: (Legal Analysis) The post-independence civilian and military regimes in Burma uniformly detest the British colonial regime (1800s-1948); however, Burmese governments seem to love the hundreds (perhaps thousands) of laws that were enacted by the British regime to suppress its colonial subjects. Indeed, post-independence governments in Burma have continuously utilized colonial laws to suppress Burmese citizens. These laws are in direct conflict with the Nargis Constitution (the Constitution of the Republic of the Union of Burma, 2008) and contradict international human rights standards. Accordingly, they should be repealed outright or amended by the current Hluttaws with President Thein Sein’s signature and declaration. The following are among the many colonial-era laws utilized by President Thein Sein’s government to defend itself and to suppress the people.
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ASEAN Chairmanship and President U Thein Sein’s Government

16 November 2011: Leaders of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) will meet in Bali, Indonesia on November 17-19. One of the most important items on the agenda will be whether Burma should chair ASEAN in 2014. Before the ASEAN leaders make a historic decision which could impact ASEAN members’ relationships with their international partners, they should strongly consider whether President U Thein Sein’s government represents ASEAN’s unique values. As a candidate for ASEAN Chairmanship, Burma must fulfil the principles embodied in ASEAN’s charter, including acceleration of economic growth, social progress, and cultural development; the promotion of regional peace and stability; and a respect for justice and the rule of law. Therefore, understanding the values represented by the ASEAN Chairmanship, President U Then Sein’s government must take the following actions immediately and unconditionally to demonstrate to the world that his government is fully qualified for ASEAN leadership.
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Misreading Naypyidaw: Premature hopes of change in Burma

27 September 2011: There has been much commentary recently by academics, activists and other observers regarding recent changes that have taken place inside Burma. These are said to include steps taken by the regime towards democratic reform of the country’s political system, the adoption of a more conciliatory attitude towards Aung San Suu Kyi and even a stated desire to end the country’s civil war.
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Why Advocacy: Critique of ICG's Burma Report

25 September 2011: It came as no surprise and is well expected that ICG (International Crisis Group) came up on the side of the Burmese military bullies against the entire people of Burma and the international community as it had always done, since the Burmese Junta assumed power in 1988. But I would humbly like to point out some of the fallacies.
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No Will for Genuine Reforms or National Reconciliation

23 September 2011: There is a Burmese saying, “A snake sees the legs of another snake” meaning only the Burmese can see the craftiness and the cunningness of another Burmese, as they are the same birds of a feather, whereas a foreigner however expert he/she may be, have not gone through the experience of living in Burma and could not comprehend the pitfalls created by the Junta.
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Burma’s Armed Resistance Needs International Support

02 September 2011: In the ongoing struggle against the tyrannical military rule in Burma, the anti-authoritarian opposition groups have applied two methods of resistance: underground armed resistance and above-ground non-violent resistance. The shared goal of both armed and unarmed resistance is to uproot totalitarianism and restore genuine democratic reform based on federalism.
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Burma’s Union Perspective: Time to Stand Together

20 August 2011: Burma has been a pariah nation since 1988, shun by the civilized international community. The Burmese army is reviled domestically and around the world. This is galling to the men in uniforms and naturally these Generals want to sit smart in the community of the civilized nations in spite of their gross human rights violations.
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