20 women from Burma, Indonesia rescued from slavery Featured

(Photo: Antislavery International) (Photo: Antislavery International)
KUALA LUMPUR, 18 January 2016 -- Malaysian police raided a premise that has been used to house women from Burma and Indonesia as slaves at Shah Alam, not far from Kuala Lumpur.

The police rescued 20 young women who were forced to work without being paid for 10 months in Malaysia. They were manipulated by human traffickers, and compelled to carry rice for four hours every day.

In addition to the routine of carrying rice, they were also forced to work as cleaners in different places around Kuala Lumpur including Sunway, Shah Alam and Kota Kemuning in the state of Selangor.

To prevent them from running away, human traffickers confiscated their travel documents, and they were cut off from communication with the outside world.

The premise was guarded by several ‘wardens’ including a woman from Burma, and all the slaves were locked inside a cage-like room.

During the raid, police have detained an employer, several ‘wardens’, and agents that provide foreign workers. Suspects detained include several Malaysians, one Bangladeshi and one Burmese.

Victims were sent to shelter, and the case is being investigated under Malaysia’s Anti-Trafficking in Person Act. - Reporting by Thomas Chong

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